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Posts Tagged ‘Basho’

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Most of my writing over the years has come after my meditations.  It is a free flowing writing that does not have form.  It is my inner voice speaking to me and it has been a wonderful way to remember the insights I had during my meditations.

I have joined a poetry group and the poets in this group write some stirring poems.  When I try to write in form, my poems seem a little stiff or forced to me. Then I came across Japanese Haiku.  Basho is a famous Japanese poet and I have some of his poems on my blog and people always love to read them.

So during our recent snow storms, I have been reflecting on spring and I wrote a few Haiku.  Haiku has 5 syllables in the 1st line, 7 syllables in the 2nd and 5 syllables in the 3rd.  Give it a try if you like to write poetry! I think it is fun!

Jane’s Spring Haiku 2018

Cluster of blossoms

Call to the awakening

New birth peeks out

 

Spring snow covers

Still Crocus waits in silence

My impatience grows

 

Buds before blooms

Cherry blossoms soon to grace

Snow tipped branch

 

A promise always

To return to love’s blooming

Upon a spring day

Happy Spring everyone!  We will be celebrating the return of our spring blossoms soon.

Peacefully, Jane

cropped-jane2-469x640

Jane Rosalea Brown, BA, CSW

Graduate of IONS Conscious Aging Facilitator

USUI Reiki Master, Natural Sound Healing

Author, In Silence, Discovering Self through Meditation

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Many who visit my blog enjoy reading poetry by Japanese poet Basho. Here is some information about him from Wikipedia.

Matsuo Basho (松尾 芭蕉, 1644–1694), born 松尾 金作, then Matsuo Chūemon Munefusa (松尾 忠右衛門 宗房),[2][3] was the most famous poet of the Edo period in Japan.

Portrait of Basho by Hkusai, late 18th century

During his lifetime, Bashō was recognized for his works in the collaborative haikai no rengaform; today, after centuries of commentary, he is recognized as the greatest master of haiku (then called hokku). Matsuo Bashō’s poetry is internationally renowned; and, in Japan, many of his poems are reproduced on monuments and traditional sites.

Although Bashō is justifiably famous in the West for his hokku, he himself believed his best work lay in leading and participating in renku. He is quoted as saying, “Many of my followers can write hokku as well as I can. Where I show who I really am is in linking haikai verses.”[4]

Bashō was introduced to poetry at a young age, and after integrating himself into the intellectual scene of Edo (modern Tokyo) he quickly became well known throughout Japan. He made a living as a teacher; but then renounced the social, urban life of the literary circles and was inclined to wander throughout the country, heading west, east, and far into the northern wilderness to gain inspiration for his writing.

basho A statute of Basho

His poems were influenced by his firsthand experience of the world around him, often encapsulating the feeling of a scene in a few simple elements.
even a horse

arrests my eyes—on this

snowy morrow [1684]

another year is gone

 

a traveler’s shade on my head,

straw sandals at my feet [1685]

 

an ancient pond

a frog jumps in

the splash of water [1686]

 

now then, let’s go out

to enjoy the snow … until

I slip and fall! [1688]

Jane’s Haiku

Here is a Haiku that the above haiku by Basho inspired after my morning walk in the snow!

Inner child’s call
Joy of heart’s true passion
Playing in the snow
Feb. 12, 2018
Jane Rosalea Brown

Have fun and try writing some Haiku.  Quiet your mind like you do when you meditate. Listen within and let the words flow.  Most Haiku in modern day.. 5 syllables…7 syllables..5 syllables (3 lines)  I loved to read them,

Peacefully, Jane

 

cropped-jane2-469x640Jane Rosalea Brown, BA, CSW

USUI Reiki Master

Author In Silence, Discovering Self through Meditation

Author name: Jane Rosalea Booth

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